Community Impact

Paul serves as the Community Impact Manager of United Way of Rock River Valley.

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The Psychological Benefits of Doing Community Service.

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Volunteering is an excellent way to give back to your community. You can encourage others to persevere through troubling hardship and more, but community service can also have major health and psychological benefits for you as well.

1. Community Service Improves Physical Health and Mood

How you feel mentally is linked to the health and wellness of your body. Community service initiatives provide a means of increasing physical activity, which can improve overall health. According to Stephanie Watson of Harvard Health Publications, individuals who volunteer on a regular basis are less likely to develop high blood pressure and other cardiovascular issues.

For example, walking for an hour while performing community service increases your heart rate and provides health benefits. If an activity is more strenuous, such as performing difficult tasks for the elderly, the health benefits increase as well. However, the key lies in not over-exerting yourself and knowing when a break is necessary. This helps prevent injury while still gaining the mental health benefits.

2. Helping Others in the Rock River Valley Boosts Self-Esteem.

Volunteering has a way of helping you put problems aside and focus on a positive activity, even if it is for a short time. In addition, volunteering can act as a coping skill, allowing you “escape other pressures,” reports  Lea Winerman of the American Psychological Association. Poor or decreased self-esteem is often the result of abuse or feeling underappreciated. When you volunteer to help the people in an around the Rock River Valley, you engage in an activity that will be appreciated. Furthermore, the boosts to self-esteem may also increase as social interaction improves interpersonal skills and mood.

3. Social Interaction Encourages Personal Development and Mental Wellness.

Social interaction has a well-documented history of being leveraged to prevent cognitive decline throughout life. However, you can improve your social skills as you make friends and interact with other people while volunteering. In addition, volunteering may lead to career opportunities and new ideas for hobbies or other activities that can promote a positive mindset and happy mood.

Social support and interaction has also been linked to increased longevity. In other words, increasing your interactions with other people will help you live longer and with increased capacity. This may be related to better understanding of complex issues that could impact health or by making better health-conscious decisions.

4. Volunteering Can Provide a Sense of Purpose.

It is easy to feel overwhelmed in life, and nearly everyone has felt the sting of feeling inept or useless. However, volunteering and giving back through community service opportunities in Rock River Valley can act a sense of purpose. If you have plans to help others, you are more likely to care for yourself to ensure you meet those obligations. It is a win-win scenario.

Find a Way to Give Back Through Community Service Now.

United Way of Rock River Valley understands the benefits of community service and can help you find an appropriate venue for community service in the area. Check out the possible community service opportunities now, and start giving back to the community that relies on people like you. 

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Guest Monday, 20 November 2017